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What you might have missed in 2016…

As a last minute festive treat (!) in the vein of so many TV shows this time of year, I thought I’d give a bit of a roundup of some interesting articles from a range of publications and websites that you may (or may not) have spotted this year.

So go grab a mulled wine coffee (mince pie optional) and enjoy a read…

man-with-mince-pies

Not more mince pies?

Neurodiversity

Mental health

HR and disability

Dyslexia

Diabetes

And just to add … have a very merry Christmas break and a Happy New Year from the Disability Task Group – see you in 2017!

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

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What Happens Next 2016

what-happens-next-2016

What Happens Next 2016 report

The What Happens Next Report, by the Disability Task Group (DTG), looks at the career destinations of disabled graduates.

This year’s report again shows that disabled graduates are generally more successful in obtaining employment or further study than perhaps has previously been assumed. It is clear that graduates with certain disabilities are likely to be more successful in this than others, for example those who disclosed a SpLD had comparable statistics to those with no known disability, however those with a social/ASD condition were more likely to be unemployed.

In addition to looking at first degree destinations, this year we also looked at the destinations of graduates from higher degrees (both taught and research) which showed that there was an increase in the proportion entering part time or full time employment at higher degree (taught) and more markedly at higher degree (research), which is perhaps to be anticipated. There was however, an exception to this: graduates with mental health conditions were not more likely to obtain employment if they had gained a higher degree (either taught or research). This is certainly an area that we feel should be explored further looking forward.

We also analysed how graduates found out about their jobs and also contains a section on disclosure of disability. The proportion of graduates disclosing a disability decreased with level of qualification, despite the fact that only slightly less disabled graduates than non-disabled graduates progressed to full time or part time study after their first degree.

The report possibly uncovers more questions than answer suggesting several different areas that could be researched into in more detail. Hopefully you will find it useful.

You can download the report from the Disability Task Group webpage which can be located at http://bit.ly/agcasdtg

 

Mark Allen, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Imperial College London

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ArtsMinds – looking after the industry

I recently came across this site, which I think is fairly new, and I thought it might be of interest to readers of this blog, particularly those who work with students and graduates aiming for careers in performance or other creative roles.

ArtsMinds is a collaborative initiative from BAPAM (British Association of Performing Arts Medicine), Equity, Spotlight and The Stage to bring together into one place a raft of resources for performers and creative practitioners facing mental health issues. Find out more at:

http://www.artsminds.co.uk/

 

ArtsMinds logo

ArtsMinds

Alison Skellern, Disability Task Group, De Montfort University

 

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British Stammering Association – National Conference 2016, Manchester

Stammering conference

I have been asked to publicise the BSA National Conference 2016 in Manchester which takes place 2 – 4th September 2016.

The theme is ‘improvement’. Improvements in speech are welcome, but improvement is possible in many more ways, such as communication in general, understanding of stammering, the environment for people who stammer, and our experience of living with stammering.

Booking is open now and a full provisional programme can be found here: http://www.stammering.org/sites/default/files/BSA%202016%20programme.pdf

For full information about the event go to: www.stammering.org/get-involved/events/bsa-national-conference-2016-Manchester

Mark Allen, Imperial College London, Disability Task Group

 

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Fancy a productive chat?

 

Most of our blog readers who are members of the Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services will be aware of the following discussion list, or will have spotted it being promoted in a recent Arena email newsletter.

But, just in case you missed it, I just wanted to highlight the existence of AGCAS Disability Development Network (DDN) Discussion List.

The AGCAS-DDN discussion list is for AGCAS members with an interest in developing careers materials to support students and graduates with disabilities.

The list is used to share best practice, information and resources. You can also use it to ask your AGCAS colleagues any disability related questions.

Members of the AGCAS Disability Task Group also use the list to communicate updates from the group.

To join the list you just need to email lists@agcas.org.uk.

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

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Career Pathways Project: Supporting students and graduates in the transition to employment – guest post

Many thanks to Eileen Daly (Careers Adviser for Students with Disabilities) at the Careers Advisory Service, Trinity College, Dublin. Eileen has provided the guest post below, describing the success of The Career Pathways project partnership…

Career Pathways logo

Career Pathways

The Career Pathways project partnership provided a flexible and individually-tailored transition service for students with disabilities, accessible throughout college, to support them to prepare for transition to employment.

The project was developed by The Career Advisory Service and the Disability Service in Trinity College Dublin (funded Jan 2014 – 2016 by the Genio trust). Dublin Institute of Technology, University College Dublin, Dublin City University, and Marino Institute of Education were partners in the project. Find out more at http://www.tcd.ie/disability/career/Pathways/

Goals were set collaboratively with the student and a plan of action was agreed. A range of resources were available to students to support them to achieve their individual goals. These included: individual meetings with Occupational Therapists, Careers Advisers, Disability Officers and Assistive Technology Officers.

Students also attended monthly workshops facilitated by peer supporters and a variety of employer events as well as a three day annual boot camp. Career development resources were created via a specially designed e-portfolio system.

The process involved three stages:

  • Exploring your career
  • Building your career
  • Launching your career

Topics discussed in meetings and workshops included CV development, interview preparation, refining reasonable accommodations for the workplace, disclosure of disability at work and managing health and well-being in the workplace.

Project outcomes:

  • 126 students with disabilities used Career Pathways between January 2014 and December 2016.
  • Over 400 individual meetings took place between students and OTs / Careers Advisers.
  • 61 students accessed the ePortfolio system, developed within the project to allow students to log their work related experiences and engagement with resources.
  • 75 students attended monthly workshops and a three day careers boot camp (May 2015 & May 2016) delivered by the OTs, Careers Advisers, peers, ambassadors, and employers.
  • 14 student ambassadors have been recruited who will act as peer mentors to future students.
  • 26 Disability and Careers Service staff from four Dublin colleges have attended training workshops on supporting students with disabilities in their transition to employment.
  • 16 employers have connected with Career Pathways, with three large multi-national employers hosting events in their head offices.

 

An online resource, “Inclusive approaches to working with students with disabilities – the journey from study to employment” was developed and is available at: https://www.tcd.ie/disability/assets/pdf/Career%20Pathways%20publication.pdf

The project has concluded and we envisage the learning from the project will continue to be beneficial to students, graduates and careers and disability service professionals in the future.

Eileen Daly, Careers Adviser for Students with Disabilities, Careers Advisory Service, Trinity College Dublin, July 2016

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Every little helps?

Before you point it out I do know that it’s a different supermarket’s slogan but hey – it got your attention!

You probably spotted the following story back in April as it was quite widely reported in the press. An Asda superstore in Manchester was praised for introducing a ‘quiet hour’ in an attempt to make shopping easier for people with autism and other disabilities.

Asda living shop

As The Huffington Post reported, “The Asda Living store in Cheetham Hill will be completely silent for sixty minutes every Saturday. Escalators will be stopped and in-store music turned down during the hour, in which its boss says you will be “able to hear a pin drop”. Display TVs and tannoy announcements will also be switched off, to make the experience better for people with autism who can find loud noises difficult to deal with.”

Good news for some shoppers and undoubtedly good publicity for Asda, but this story also got me thinking about our careers fairs and other similar events. Continue reading

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