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Let’s Talk

Here’s a quirky little film that I thought I’d share – aimed at employers to help them discuss mental health with their staff.

This film has been produced through the MINDFUL EMPLOYER initiative which provides managers, businesses and organisations with information, support and training regarding staff who experience stress, anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions.

mindful-employer

“Talking about mental health at work is difficult for everyone concerned. Beginning as a black and white, silent movie, Let’s Talk portrays the difficulties that arise through poor communication. As the film progresses, it gains both colour and a voice as we see how talking to each other enables support and understanding.”

Watch now at https://youtu.be/K6ThH_1aDf4

Find out more about MINDFUL EMPLOYER.

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

 

 

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Finding work interactive eBook – free resource from the National Autistic Society

I recently came across this workbook in the NAS online shop work – our blog readers may find it of interest.

nas-finding-work-e-book

Description

“This digital workbook is designed to help autistic adults prepare themselves for employment.

Developed by employment experts at The National Autistic Society, it will support you through the job finding process with information and activities at each stage.

Topics include understanding your autism better, choosing a suitable role, applying for roles, preparing for and getting through interviews, finding work experience, working on your communication and social skills, managing anxiety and preparing for the workplace.

How to use this digital workbook

To have the best experience of this workbook, you’ll need to view it using Adobe Reader software, which you can download for free.”

Download your free workbook copy at:

http://www.autism.org.uk/findingwork

Alison Skellern, AGCAS Disability Task Group, De Montfort University

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7 steps to make your Careers Service more accessible to blind and visually impaired students – guest post

Jessica Luke from Blind in Business recently provided us with the following guest blog post aimed at careers professionals.

Blind in Business is a charity that runs a free careers service for blind and visually impaired students. Many of the students we support have never used their university careers service. Some say they lacked the confidence to get in touch, others did not think that their university careers service could help them.blind-in-business-logo

You may do all of this already, but just in case here are 7 easy steps to encourage your blind and visually impaired students to get in touch: Continue reading

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What you might have missed in 2016…

As a last minute festive treat (!) in the vein of so many TV shows this time of year, I thought I’d give a bit of a roundup of some interesting articles from a range of publications and websites that you may (or may not) have spotted this year.

So go grab a mulled wine coffee (mince pie optional) and enjoy a read…

man-with-mince-pies

Not more mince pies?

Neurodiversity

Mental health

HR and disability

Dyslexia

Diabetes

And just to add … have a very merry Christmas break and a Happy New Year from the Disability Task Group – see you in 2017!

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

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What Happens Next 2016

what-happens-next-2016

What Happens Next 2016 report

The What Happens Next Report, by the Disability Task Group (DTG), looks at the career destinations of disabled graduates.

This year’s report again shows that disabled graduates are generally more successful in obtaining employment or further study than perhaps has previously been assumed. It is clear that graduates with certain disabilities are likely to be more successful in this than others, for example those who disclosed a SpLD had comparable statistics to those with no known disability, however those with a social/ASD condition were more likely to be unemployed.

In addition to looking at first degree destinations, this year we also looked at the destinations of graduates from higher degrees (both taught and research) which showed that there was an increase in the proportion entering part time or full time employment at higher degree (taught) and more markedly at higher degree (research), which is perhaps to be anticipated. There was however, an exception to this: graduates with mental health conditions were not more likely to obtain employment if they had gained a higher degree (either taught or research). This is certainly an area that we feel should be explored further looking forward.

We also analysed how graduates found out about their jobs and also contains a section on disclosure of disability. The proportion of graduates disclosing a disability decreased with level of qualification, despite the fact that only slightly less disabled graduates than non-disabled graduates progressed to full time or part time study after their first degree.

The report possibly uncovers more questions than answer suggesting several different areas that could be researched into in more detail. Hopefully you will find it useful.

You can download the report from the Disability Task Group webpage which can be located at http://bit.ly/agcasdtg

 

Mark Allen, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Imperial College London

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ArtsMinds – looking after the industry

I recently came across this site, which I think is fairly new, and I thought it might be of interest to readers of this blog, particularly those who work with students and graduates aiming for careers in performance or other creative roles.

ArtsMinds is a collaborative initiative from BAPAM (British Association of Performing Arts Medicine), Equity, Spotlight and The Stage to bring together into one place a raft of resources for performers and creative practitioners facing mental health issues. Find out more at:

http://www.artsminds.co.uk/

 

ArtsMinds logo

ArtsMinds

Alison Skellern, Disability Task Group, De Montfort University

 

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British Stammering Association – National Conference 2016, Manchester

Stammering conference

I have been asked to publicise the BSA National Conference 2016 in Manchester which takes place 2 – 4th September 2016.

The theme is ‘improvement’. Improvements in speech are welcome, but improvement is possible in many more ways, such as communication in general, understanding of stammering, the environment for people who stammer, and our experience of living with stammering.

Booking is open now and a full provisional programme can be found here: http://www.stammering.org/sites/default/files/BSA%202016%20programme.pdf

For full information about the event go to: www.stammering.org/get-involved/events/bsa-national-conference-2016-Manchester

Mark Allen, Imperial College London, Disability Task Group

 

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