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Finding work interactive eBook – free resource from the National Autistic Society

I recently came across this workbook in the NAS online shop work – our blog readers may find it of interest.

nas-finding-work-e-book

Description

“This digital workbook is designed to help autistic adults prepare themselves for employment.

Developed by employment experts at The National Autistic Society, it will support you through the job finding process with information and activities at each stage.

Topics include understanding your autism better, choosing a suitable role, applying for roles, preparing for and getting through interviews, finding work experience, working on your communication and social skills, managing anxiety and preparing for the workplace.

How to use this digital workbook

To have the best experience of this workbook, you’ll need to view it using Adobe Reader software, which you can download for free.”

Download your free workbook copy at:

http://www.autism.org.uk/findingwork

Alison Skellern, AGCAS Disability Task Group, De Montfort University

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What you might have missed in 2016…

As a last minute festive treat (!) in the vein of so many TV shows this time of year, I thought I’d give a bit of a roundup of some interesting articles from a range of publications and websites that you may (or may not) have spotted this year.

So go grab a mulled wine coffee (mince pie optional) and enjoy a read…

man-with-mince-pies

Not more mince pies?

Neurodiversity

Mental health

HR and disability

Dyslexia

Diabetes

And just to add … have a very merry Christmas break and a Happy New Year from the Disability Task Group – see you in 2017!

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

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Every little helps?

Before you point it out I do know that it’s a different supermarket’s slogan but hey – it got your attention!

You probably spotted the following story back in April as it was quite widely reported in the press. An Asda superstore in Manchester was praised for introducing a ‘quiet hour’ in an attempt to make shopping easier for people with autism and other disabilities.

Asda living shop

As The Huffington Post reported, “The Asda Living store in Cheetham Hill will be completely silent for sixty minutes every Saturday. Escalators will be stopped and in-store music turned down during the hour, in which its boss says you will be “able to hear a pin drop”. Display TVs and tannoy announcements will also be switched off, to make the experience better for people with autism who can find loud noises difficult to deal with.”

Good news for some shoppers and undoubtedly good publicity for Asda, but this story also got me thinking about our careers fairs and other similar events. Continue reading

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Training course

Ready to explore autism & ADHD with a free online course?

Some of you may be interested in the following MOOC.

The University of Derby has designed a free online short course to help raise awareness and encourage communication and education about these complex conditions. The course is also endorsed by the ADHD Foundation, is free and widely available for anyone to take part in regardless of age, location or education status, but spaces are limited.

Image: ADHD Foundation

‘ADHD is one of the most common childhood conditions that can continue through adolescence and into adulthood. ADHD is thought to affect between 3-9% of school age children and young people in the UK (NICE, 2013).

Likewise, around 700,000 people in the UK are on the autism spectrum. Together with their families they make up around 2.8 million people whose lives are touched by autism in the UK alone (National Autism Society, 2016).

The exact cause of both autism and ADHD is poorly understood, and there is currently no known cure although much can be done to support people with these conditions.’

You can register online until 17 July 2016 at:

http://www.derby.ac.uk/online/mooc/understanding-autism-aspergers-adhd?utm_source=UDOL_AAAMOOCOpenForEvent_email_Jul_16&utm_medium=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=UDOL_AAAMOOCOpenForEvent_Jul_16&utm_source=OFE+SYSTEM+2+send+1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=S2+University+of+Derby+Autism+Send+1

 

Saiyada Fazal, AGCAS Disability Task Group, University of Bath

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Training course

Not sure what is meant by the term “Non-visible Disability”?

Lacking knowledge or confidence when supporting students with a non-visible disability? Then this is the course for you!

This AGCAS East Midlands Regional Training event will explore some of the issues facing students with a non-visible disability, and enable participants to share good practice and information resources.

The aim of this event is to increase participants’ confidence and knowledge when working with students with non-visible disabilities, and will cover the following –

  • What is a “non-visible” disability?
  • Positive self-marketing for students: role models, and examples of strengths and attributes of those with a non-visible disability.
  • Signs and symptoms of some of the more common non-visible disabilities.
  • Hints and tips for supporting students with a non-visible disability, including information resources.

There will be contributions from two university careers services (De Montfort University, Leicester and the London School of Economics) and a speaker with experience of overcoming a hidden disability to succeed in the workplace.

Some interactive group work will be included as well as the opportunity to share good practice and useful resources.

See the AGCAS website for booking details: http://www.agcas.org.uk/events/1293-Seeing-the-unseen-How-to-spot-and-support-students-with-non-visible-disabilities-Leicester

Alison Skellern, AGCAS Disability Task Group, DMU

 

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What Happens Next 2015 Report

The latest edition of ‘What Happens Next: A Report on the First Destinations of Disabled Graduates’ is now available. This report compares the employment outcomes of disabled and non-disabled university leavers six months after graduation and draws upon the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

In the report (attached) we looked at:
– Disabled graduate destinations
– How they found their jobs
– Their reasons for choosing their jobs
– How well they felt university prepared them for their next career step

You can download the report here on the AGCAS website.

We hope you find it interesting and useful.

Mark Allen, Careers Consultant, Imperial College London

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