Training course

Do you have questions about visual impairment?

Just wanted to highlight a course being held by Visualise Training and Consultancy this September and October that may be of interest:

  • How do I support a visually impaired person?
  • Is visual language such as “see you later” offensive?
  • How do I guide someone with sight loss?
  • How can I ensure my business is accessible for people with sight loss?
Picture to illustrate Visual Impairment training

Visual Impairment training

These courses are intended to raise awareness of visual impairment, and best business practice in supporting VI customers and colleagues. Informative, motivational and inspiring.

You will gain an understanding of:

  • The main eye conditions and the importance of eye health care
  • How to safely guide a person with a visual impairment
  • Appropriate language and effective communication, is it ok to say “see you later”?
  • Reasonable adjustments as per the Equality Act 2010

Book your place in Cardiff or London

Alison Skellern, AGCAS Disability Task Group, De Montfort University

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7 steps to make your Careers Service more accessible to blind and visually impaired students – guest post

Jessica Luke from Blind in Business recently provided us with the following guest blog post aimed at careers professionals.

Blind in Business is a charity that runs a free careers service for blind and visually impaired students. Many of the students we support have never used their university careers service. Some say they lacked the confidence to get in touch, others did not think that their university careers service could help them.blind-in-business-logo

You may do all of this already, but just in case here are 7 easy steps to encourage your blind and visually impaired students to get in touch: Continue reading

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I’m a blind Paralympian with a master’s, but getting a job was my biggest hurdle…

In case you missed it, I thought our readers might be interested in a recent Guardian article from Jessica Luke, a blind graduate and Paralympian, who believes that unfair application processes are still excluding her, and many other blind jobseekers, from graduate roles.

 Great Britain’s Jessica Luke (left) and Georgina Bullen (right) during the women’s goalball match against Denmark. Photograph: Chris Radburn/PA

Great Britain’s Jessica Luke (left) and Georgina Bullen (right) during the women’s goalball match against Denmark. Photograph: Chris Radburn/PA

Luke backs up her message with the depressing statistic that,
“Two-thirds of registered blind and partially sighted people of working age are not in paid employment.” (Douglas et al, Network 1000, 2006)

As usual the comments below are interesting too. Well worth a read I think.

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

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What Happens Next 2015 Report

The latest edition of ‘What Happens Next: A Report on the First Destinations of Disabled Graduates’ is now available. This report compares the employment outcomes of disabled and non-disabled university leavers six months after graduation and draws upon the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

In the report (attached) we looked at:
– Disabled graduate destinations
– How they found their jobs
– Their reasons for choosing their jobs
– How well they felt university prepared them for their next career step

You can download the report here on the AGCAS website.

We hope you find it interesting and useful.

Mark Allen, Careers Consultant, Imperial College London

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