Training course

Do you have questions about visual impairment?

Just wanted to highlight a course being held by Visualise Training and Consultancy this September and October that may be of interest:

  • How do I support a visually impaired person?
  • Is visual language such as “see you later” offensive?
  • How do I guide someone with sight loss?
  • How can I ensure my business is accessible for people with sight loss?
Picture to illustrate Visual Impairment training

Visual Impairment training

These courses are intended to raise awareness of visual impairment, and best business practice in supporting VI customers and colleagues. Informative, motivational and inspiring.

You will gain an understanding of:

  • The main eye conditions and the importance of eye health care
  • How to safely guide a person with a visual impairment
  • Appropriate language and effective communication, is it ok to say “see you later”?
  • Reasonable adjustments as per the Equality Act 2010

Book your place in Cardiff or London

Alison Skellern, AGCAS Disability Task Group, De Montfort University

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Training course

AGCAS training event. Seeing the unseen: How to spot and support students with non-visible disabilities

Date June 1st 2017, Venue: Imperial College London, now open to all AGCAS members

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Venue: Imperial College London

The aim of this event is to increase participants’ confidence and knowledge when working with students with non-visible disabilities, and will cover the following –

  • What is a “non-visible” disability?
  • Positive self-marketing for students: Role models, and examples of strengths and attributes of those with a non-visible disability.
  • Signs and symptoms of some of the more common non-visible disabilities.
  • Hints and tips for supporting students with a non-visible disability, including information resources.

There will be contributions from two university careers services (De Montfort University, Leicester and the London School of Economics) and a speaker with experience of overcoming a non-visible disability to succeed in the workplace: Our speaker is Edward Howlin, IT Delivery Manager at the Food Standards Agency. Edward is an alumnus of the London School of Economics and will be talking about his own experiences as a student, an employee, and an employer with a non-visible disability.

Some interactive group work will be included as well as the opportunity to share good practice and useful resources.

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Let’s Talk

Here’s a quirky little film that I thought I’d share – aimed at employers to help them discuss mental health with their staff.

This film has been produced through the MINDFUL EMPLOYER initiative which provides managers, businesses and organisations with information, support and training regarding staff who experience stress, anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions.

mindful-employer

“Talking about mental health at work is difficult for everyone concerned. Beginning as a black and white, silent movie, Let’s Talk portrays the difficulties that arise through poor communication. As the film progresses, it gains both colour and a voice as we see how talking to each other enables support and understanding.”

Watch now at https://youtu.be/K6ThH_1aDf4

Find out more about MINDFUL EMPLOYER.

Claire Byron, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Newcastle University

 

 

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Training Day – Friday 10th April

AGCAS Disability Task Group is running a training event at Liverpool Hope University on Friday 10th April which focuses on ‘Guiding Disabled Students through the Recruitment and Selection Process’.

Although originally offered through the NW Regional Training Programme, as there are still a few places available, this is now open to Careers Service staff from across the UK. Topics covered during the day will include researching how disability positive an employer is; disclosing a disability; positive self-marketing and reasonable adjustments at each stage of the application and selection process and in the workplace.

The day will include input from members of the task group, the HR Manager from Liverpool Hope University, the National Autistic Society and Remploy.

Bookings will close on Wednesday 1st April and to reserve a place please contact Clare Worrall-Hill worralc@hope.ac.uk

Hilary Whorrall, AGCAS DTG.

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Supporting disabled students’ transitions from Higher Education into employment: What works?

In November 2014 the Equality Challenge Unit published a report on helping disabled students during that all important transition between H.E. and employment. The report ‘Supporting disabled students’ transitions from Higher Education into employment: What works?’ follows an investigation into the provision of support focused on disabled students across H.E. Institutions. This research was gathered from a range of sources including university careers services, disability organisations, and of course disabled students. The outcome is an interesting and valuable report which proactive careers services looking to improve their provision for disabled students could really extremely useful.

The report initially taps into what careers services should hopefully always aim to be well versed, in such as employers’ duty to make reasonable adjustments, or the availability of funding for workplace support, along with links to a range of useful resources. Building on this however it contains real value in sharing ideas and good practices that careers services across the UK have employed successfully. These could be used ideas and inspiration for all able services. For example, in the section on Providing accessible information, advice and guidance to disabled students and graduates there are descriptions of a great range of initiatives which include,

  • Brunel University – along with providing leaflets and documents on important issues for the students on the likes of disclosure, the Placement and Careers Service have written a ‘Good practice guide for employers on providing work placements to disabled students’. Useful to assist employers interested in their students becoming diversity focused.
  • Staffordshire University – the Careers Centre run a series of talks designed for disabled students which has been put together following consultation with the university’s Student Enabling Centre and the Disabled Students’ Engagement Group, who decided which talks would be of most use. A programme created in collaboration with those who will use it.

These, and many more noted initiatives can be very useful in arming students with information and opportunities to meet diversity positive employers, however the report has some information on other initiatives aimed at assisting with the transition into H.E. in the first place. E.g.

  • Manchester Met have developed a peer-mentoring service, where new students prior to starting their course are offered a peer mentor; a disabled student already attending the institution. This aims to reduce student drop for new students out during the transition into H.E., along with helping present students use and develop employability schemes through being a mentor.

There are of course limitations with this report’s ideas. What it does do is contain a lot of information, inspirational ideas and initiatives, which along with summarised overall recommendations could really make a difference to assisting the transition between H.E. and employment. What it does not take into account is that institutions and services are constrained with resources, funding, institutional politics which can really limit what they can realistically aspire to achieve.

Having said that the report gives some useful information and insight into existing good practice on within H.E. careers services and, for those services who are willing and able, can be used as a handbook of strategies and ideas to really add to provision for disabled students, and hopefully with their transition from H.E. to the workplace.

You can download this report at the following link.
http://www.ecu.ac.uk/publications/supporting-disabled-students-transitions-higher-education-employment/

Mark Allen, AGCAS Disability Task Group, Imperial College London

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Enhancing your work with disabled students and graduates – AGCAS Training Event – Monday 24th March 2014

Hilary Whorrall and I are facilitating the above session at The Open University in Milton Keynes.  We have a few places left, further details and booking form can be found on the AGCAS website.  If you are interested contact me as soon as possible at eddie.tunnah@open.ac.uk

It should be a good day – in addition to ourselves we have inputs from the Open University’s Mental Health Adviser, and organisations Leonard Cheshire Disability and EmployAbility.

It will also be the chance to have a first look at the Disability Task Groups new video: ‘Get that job: a guide for graduates with disabilities’.

Eddie Tunnah, Chair of Disability Task Group.Image

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The New AGCAS DTG Blog!

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Welcome to the new AGCAS Disability Task Group blog.

Our group comprises of H.E. careers professionals from across the UK whose aim is to make progress on a range of issues concerning support for disabled students and graduates. We have decided to start this blog for a few reasons.

Firstly, to keep likeminded careers professionals up to date with the group’s work, such as,
– Training events, like the ‘Enhancing your work with disabled students and graduates‘ session next month
– Reports, including the as ‘What Happens Next?’ which details destinations information of disabled graduates across the UK.
– Information resources, such as ‘Working with disabled students and graduates – FAQs’ on the AGCAS website.

Secondly, we hope to use this blog as a place to share experience and good practice from both ourselves, and other practitioners across AGCAS, when working with disabled students.

Thirdly, we intend to highlight any new useful resources, organisations or training events that we feel may be of interest to other careers professionals who share interest in working with students and graduates with disabilities.

If you are interested please stay tuned, sign up, or do whatever people do with blogs, and we hope that you will find this blog useful and/or interesting. Hopefully both!

Mark Allen

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